Tag Archives: Aunt Sallys

Aunt Sally’s Original Creole Praline

I’m convinced that The South is responsible for at least 50% of the annual sugar consumption, world wide. I base this on my own experience while vacationing in South Carolina and Georgia several years ago. (They also have the corner on hog fat, but that’s another subject.)

When I was in The South, everything that could be sugared, was. Anything that gets a “skosh” of sugar anywhere else in the US, would get a barrel full there. Case in point: Iced Tea. Great iced tea is brewed with fresh tea, to a clear amber. Great iced tea doesn’t need sugar. Good tea can be enhanced with a small amount.

Southern Sweet Tea recipes recommend using anywhere from 3/4 cup to 1-1/2 cups of sugar per pitcher. Most recipes recommend you make Simple Syrup so you don’t have any grittiness from the sugar. Use even amounts of sugar and water. Bring to a boil and immediately, cover and remove from heat. Let sit for 15-20 minutes, then add to the pitcher of tea.

Where am I going with this? Oh yeah, pralines.

Pralines are a very Southern treat. My daughter went to New Orleans with her boyfriend for the holidays, and returned with a box of Aunt Sally’s Original Creole Pralines. They bill themselves as “New Orleans Most Famous Praline.” Since I’ve never heard of them, I guess they’re famous mainly in New Orleans.

Because I’m game for unusual foods, daughter gave me one to try.

 

The first mistake I made was to read the Nutrition Facts. Candy should not have Nutrition Facts. If you’re concerned about nutrition, you shouldn’t eat candy. I looked anyway. One serving has 180 calories, 8 grams of fat, and 29 grams of Carbs (28 of those from sugar, what a surprise). On the plus side, they provide 2% of my daily requirement of Vitamin A and Calcium.

Ingredients include Sugar, Corn Syrup, and High Fructose Corn Syrup. Oh, and some pecans, evaporated milk, vanilla flavoring, and both margarine and butter.

I broke off a small piece and gave it a try. It was a strongly vanilla-flavored grainy sugar mass that dissolved quickly, leaving a greasy residue on the tongue with a piece of soft pecan. Not really bad, but definitely an acquired taste.

If you’re adventurous, check out Aunt Sally’s. They have all kinds of Louisiana foods that will satisfy any carb craving.

I think I’ll keep the rest of this praline on hand in case I ever have a hypoglycemic attack and need something to raise my blood glucose fast.